WHS Logo

Itchan Kala

Itchan Kala
Itchan Kala, the inner town of Khiva, is a preserved example of a Muslem city in Asia at the beginning of the 19th century. The town is completely surrounded by brick city walls, which have four gates at the cardinal points.

The oasis of Khiva was the last halting place for caravans before the desert in Iran. Since the 4th century it was the center of Khorezm civilization, an Iranian kingdom famous in Antiquity for its hydraulic techniques.

Nowadays, Itchan Kala presents unique examples of moslem architecture in the Djuma mosque and the many medressehs. There is also traditional domestic architecture: enclosed houses with courtyards, reception room and private apartments.

Year Decision Comments
1990 Inscribed Reasons for inscription



Visit May 2010

At first sight the Itchan Khala of Khiva is a deception: an almost empty open air museum, except for numerous French tour groups with loud guides. Where have I landed? Is this the once so remote oasis town? The monumental walls, gates and other historic buildings in town look over-restored as well.

Fortunately I stayed here for two nights, and it certainly grew on me. My hotel (the Arkonchi) is located within the walled section, making it easy to wander around during all hours of the day. Although only early May, the temperatures easily reached 35 degrees Celsius during the day. So the best exploring was in the early mornings and evenings. The rest of the day I spent hanging around in one of Uzbekistan's best features: the chaikhanas (tea houses).

Almost every building in town is some sort of museum or shop (or combination of these two). I just entered them all - sometimes I was disappointed because of the overly commercial atmosphere, but I was pleasantly surprised too a number of times. Highlights certainly not to be missed are the Pahlavan Mahmud Mausoleum (tiled all over and very serene), the Djuma mosque with its 112 wooden colums and the Tosh Kovli Palace.

More photos can be found in the Picture Gallery

line

Reviews

Jorge Sanchez (Spain):
Back in the year 1992 I made a fantastic train journey from Bukhara to Moscow stopping is some interesting places. The train runs parallel to the Amu Daria River. Women on board dressed the colourful Uzbek silk clothes, and men used to wear the typical cap of Central Asia republics on their heads.
Arriving to Urguench I got off the train, and then took a bus to Khiva, since there is not train service to that city. The distance was about 30 kilometers.
In the past, I had been several times in exotic Khiva, a 1001 nights like small town with unbelievable beautiful minarets and an intimate atmosphere, but I wanted to go back because of its superlative charm.
Khiva is a small jewel, one of those enchanting towns that you love at the first sight, like Cartagena de Indias, Kathmandu, Guilin, Toledo, Santiago de Compostela, San Francisco, Kyoto, Jerusalem…
I climbed to have a panorama view over the town and the unfinished minaret. From that elevation Khiva looked still more impressive.
I slept in a cheap hostel within the walls, which name I do not remember, and the next day I caught a bus back to Urguench and then boarded another train to Moscow
Date posted: September 2013
Paul Tanner (UK):
The WHS of “Khiva” is more properly titled the “Itchan Kala” (or Ichon Qala or Ichan-kala) which refers specifically to the old walled town of the Khiva Oasis. The town is very heavily restored and operates virtually as an open air museum in its own right. Indeed the main gate holds a ticket office where entrance fees and camera charges are paid. Locals do live inside and it is possible to “enter” from other gates – but you will not get into the museums without a ticket.

Many of the buildings inside the walls are museums and, when one has added the tourist shops, the carpet factories and the hotels (The Hotel Khiva is an old meddressa and worth a visit even if you are not staying), there is not a great deal else. There is an obligatory “genuine” Bactrian camel for being photographed with and there are sellers of furry Uzbek hats for being photographed with! Yet Khiva in my opinion transcends all this and is “worth the journey” for the chance to experience, an albeit restored, Central Asian walled city. We particularly liked wandering around in the quiet of the evening and sunset is very fine when taken from a high place such as the Islom Huja minaret.

Your ticket entitles you to a bewildering array of entrances but not amazingly to 1 major highlight, the viewing platform in/above the Ark, which should NOT be missed (at relatively small extra cost)as it gives the best view over the whole town. A guide is well worth having (and I don’t often say that!). Many of the museums are tired left-overs from Soviet days and can be given merely a very quick “once over”, but even these can hold surprises. In one history museum we found a room praising “Khorezm”, a mighty state in the 10th -14th centuries, and now split between Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan by Stalin’s arbitrary borders and just a province in Uzbekistan. Talking to the guide we began to get a feeling for his loyalty to the concept of “Khorezm” and through that for the tribalism and nationalisms within Uzbekistan and Central Asia (A bit further north the province of “Karakalpakstan” is autonomous within Uzbekistan –albeit totally environmentally ruined by the Aral Sea disaster)
 


Have you been to Itchan Kala? Share your experiences!

Add your own review